Uptempo Venomous Poison — June 2024

May turned out to be the calm before the storm of the WSOP for me. I only played nine tournaments the whole month, with most of those being in the virtual Beaverton Quarantine home game (four cashes, in NLHE and NLHE Bounty) for a meagre 126% ROI. The loss (bigger) came from the three events I entered at the Portland Meadows Poker Classic, though I did manage to pick up one min-bounty in Event #6 PLO Assassins PKO Bounty (the entire prize pool was bounties!)

That leaves either well-rested or unprepared for next weekend’s trip to Las Vegas, where the bracelet events on my list are Event #27 Big O, Event #32 Seven-Card Stud, and Event #35 HORSE (the only bracelet event I’ve ever cashed in). Plusdepending on how things gosome of the Milestone Satellites and the Monday HORSE Deepstack. Maybe something on WSOP.com if I can figure out how screwed up my account is after six years of inactivity.

Chinook Winds Debuts Summer Series

Earlier, as I as getting ready to publish this, Chinook Winds dropped the schedule for their first Summer Classic Poker Tournament, featuring a $200K GTD Main Event and a mid-week TORSE event (with Limit Triple Draw 2-7 replacing Limit Hold’em in the rotation).

Pacific Northwest Poker Leaderboard

Key to the Leaderboard

  • Name and home town (according to the player’s Hendon Mob profile).
  • The player’s most recent ranking in the PNW Poker Leaderboard in italics. If this is their first time on the Leaderboard, an em dash ()
  • Their new standing in bold, preceded by the pound sign (#).
  • Their change in status on the Leaderboard (with an arrow indicating up or down), or a black club (♣) if this is their first appearance.
  • For each of the tournaments that are being recognized in this Leaderboard:
    • The name and link to the Hendon Mob listing for that tournament.
    • The player’s finishing position in the tournament and the number of entries.
    • The tournament prize pool in US dollars.
Katie Thurston (Lynnwood, Washington)
#3235
1st of 78 entries, $50K prize pool

Nice score for a first score! Thurston was the star of Season 17 of The Bachelorette, for those of you like myself not in the know.

Jayd Cartner (Vancouver, Washington)
#2881
2nd of 160 entries, $128K prize pool
Martin Owens (Spokane, Washington)
#2331
1st of 406 entries, $158.2K prize pool

Another extremely good first hendon Mob cash. Nice to be going into the summer with that.

Maksim Chirva (Mount Vernon, Washington)
#4872
#2182
+2690
2nd of 441 entries, $126.6K prize pool
Saul Kalvari (Richmond, British Columbia)
#4826
#1687
+3139
1st of 727 entries, $238.5K prize pool
Larry Vincent (Lewiston, Idaho)
#2911
#1293
+1618
1st of 558 entries, $270K prize pool

There appears to have been a thre-way chop in theis event, with Matthew Jewett, and David Goodkin (both further down/up the Leaderboard).

Tyler Panas (Calgary, Alberta)
#2193
#1271
+922
8th of 911 entries, $1M prize pool

Panas debuted on the Leaderboard just last month and continues to climb fast.

Valiant Chou (Richmond, Washington)
#1856
#1134
+722
4th of 558 entries, $270K prize pool
Tomi Varghase (Calgary, Alberta)
#1882
#1009
+873
5th of 911 entries, $1M prize pool
Matthew Kelly (Hillsboro, Oregon)
#1344
#1001
+343
1st of 441 entries, $126.6K prize pool
Shawn Smith (Molalla, Oregon)
#976
3rd of 3585 entries, $1.4M prize pool

While everyone was watching Adam Nattress in Event #4 (see below), Mollala’s Smith snuck through nearly 3,600 other players to grab an exceptionally good first Hendon Mob cash.

Shawn Smith (via WSOP.com)
Foster Geng (Kirkland, Washington)
#822
1st of 572 entries, $554.8K prize pool

Kind of a late report—the event was back in March—but another great start to the season.

Foster Geng (via Hendon Mob)
Peter Darlington (Calgary, Alberta)
#1516
#782
+734
1st of 1101 entries, $264K prize pool
David Goodkin (Bellevue, Washington)
#1043
#728
+315
3rd of 558 entries, $270K prize pool
John Scalise (Calgary, Alberta)
#2741
#683
+2058
2nd of 911 entries, $1M prize pool
Angel Iniquez (Richland, Washington)
#776
#630
+146
2nd of 406 entries, $158.2K prize pool
Brett Worton (Edmonton, Alberta)
#721
#598
+123
3rd of 249 entries, $159.2K prize pool
Peter Griffin (Fort McMurray, Alberta)
#731
#551
+180
1st of 249 entries, $159.2K prize pool
Jackson Spencer (Yakima, Washington)
#614
#476
+138
1st of 160 entries, $128K prize pool
David Labchuk (Calgary, Alberta)
#651
#400
+251
4th of 911 entries, $1M prize pool
Adam Nattress (Portland, Oregon)
#617
#392
+225
4th of 928 entries, $1.2M prize pool

Word went out on Day 2 that Adam was in the top 10% of the players at the end of Day 1. Then he powered his way to a not-insignificant lead by the end of Day 2. But the headline on the day-end wrap-up mentioned Jamie Kerstetter and “Miami” John Cernuto (and had pictures of both of them) but no Nattress. I knew Adam was too nice a guy to make anything out of it, but Karen-ed the heck out of it.

The Day 3 opening report had a pic of Adam but his name was initially missing from the headline. It was corrected relatively soon. Squeaky wheels, folks! You only get into these positions very rarely; make sure you get the credit you deserve!

Jeff Eldred (Calgary, Alberta)
#415
#380
+35
2nd of 249 entries, $159.2K prize pool
Zeyu Huang (Calgary, Alberta)
#690
#352
+338
3rd of 911 entries, $1M prize pool
Garrett Maybery (Edmonton, Alberta)
#410
#340
+70
2nd of 151 entries, $217K prize pool
Dongwoo Ko (Burnaby, British Columbia)
#753
#161
+592
1st of 882 entries, $2M prize pool
Pei Li (Calgary, Alberta)
#165
#160
+5
3rd of 151 entries, $217K prize pool
Dominick French (Victoria, British Columbia)
#122
#116
+6
1st of 13 entries, $68.5K prize pool
Yunkyu Song (Camas, Washington)
#115
#114
+1
4th of 735 entries, $2.2M prize pool
Mal Hagan (Langley, British Columbia)
#114
#111
+3
2nd of 1101 entries, $264K prize pool
Brent Sheirbon (Seattle, Washington)
#112
#105
+7
2nd of 263 entries, $315.2K prize pool
Matthew Jewett (Shoreline, Washington)
#108
#99
+9
2nd of 558 entries, $270K prize pool
Aaron Thivyanathan (Renton, Washington)
#78
#73
+5
3rd of 476 entries, $464.1K prize pool
Kyle Ho (Burnaby, British Columbia)
#72
#69
+3
1st of 236 entries, $150.3K prize pool
Maxwell Young (Seaside, Oregon)
#22
#22
0
2nd of 304 entries, $156.5K prize pool
Adam Hendrix (Anchorage, Alaska)
#6
#5
+1
3rd of 603 entries, $2.1M prize pool
Dylan Linde (Coeur D’Alene, Idaho)
#4
#3
+1
3rd of 116 entries, $580K prize pool
7th of 1869 entries, $5.9M prize pool
5th of 151 entries, $3M prize pool
3rd of 53 entries, $2.6M prize pool
3rd of 41 entries, $1.2M prize pool
Chris Brewer (Eugene, Oregon)
#2
#2
0
3rd of 135 entries, $3.3M prize pool

What’s That Spell?…Go To Hell! — March 2024

Another month in the red, though I briefly had hopes for this one.

No need to recap all of the thrill of min-victory and the agony of defeat at the Chinook Winds PacWest Poker Classic in the middle of the month, it’s all right here if you want to read about it.

I cashed 7 out of 17 Ignition Casino NLHE Jackpot Sit-and-Go tournaments, with just one of the winners being a 5x payout, which means…exactly $0 profit.

Because I spent an entire week at Chinook Winds, no other live play for me, though I did play five Beaverton Quarantine games via PokerStars Home Games, min-cashing a 10-player NLHE game and winning a NLHE Bounty tournament with three bounties (including my own) for a whopping 320% ROI. Not enough to cover my losses at the PacWest series!

What II’m looking at in the month(s) ahead:

  • Maybe this week’s Final Table First Friday $20K GTD NLHE.
  • Possibly the Last Frontier NLHE Freezeout on Sunday, April 7th.
  • The Final Table $30K GTD NLHE on April 27th.
  • Or the Portland Meadows Big Bet Mix April 28th.
  • There’s a whole bunch of fun coming up May 6th–12th at the Portland Meadows Poker Classic, though I’m going to have to skip their High Roller because I’ve got tickets to see Michelle Wolf. And I can only do the evening games because, you know…job.
  • I’ve booked my flight to the WSOP already. Got a lot of $2K and $5K satellites on my menu, along with HORSE, Seven Card Stud, and Big O,

Pacific Northwest Poker Leaderboard

Due to some fast reporting by the Chinook Winds tournament officials, this edition of the Leaderboard includes the big results from the recent PacWest Poker Classic!

Key to the Leaderboard

  • Name and home town (according to the player’s Hendon Mob profile).
  • The player’s most recent ranking in the PNW Poker Leaderboard in italics. If this is their first time on the Leaderboard, an em dash ()
  • Their new standing in bold, preceded by the pound sign (#).
  • Their change in status on the Leaderboard (with an arrow indicating up or down), or a black club (♣) if this is their first appearance.
  • For each of the tournaments that are being recognized in this Leaderboard:
    • The name and link to the Hendon Mob listing for that tournament.
    • The player’s finishing position in the tournament and the number of entries.
    • The tournament prize pool in US dollars.
Ryan Olin (Huslia, Alaska)
#2634
20th of 1180 entries, $3.7M prize pool
Jonathan Erickson (Salem, Oregon)
#8040
#2557
+5483
1st of 286 entries, $116.6K prize pool
Ryan Peterson (Albany, Oregon)
#7371
#2262
+5109
3rd of 441 entries, $306.9K prize pool
Khoa Ngo (Lakewood, Washington)
#2821
#1729
+1092
1st of 82 entries, $69.5K prize pool
Jerry O’Keefe (Bend, Oregon)
#6205
#1534
+4671
2nd of 441 entries, $306.9K prize pool
Jolnar Teliani (Edmonton, Alberta)
#2160
#1194
+966
2nd of 282 entries, $208.8K prize pool
Barry Frey (Medicine Hat, Alberta)
#3413
#1128
+2285
1st of 282 entries, $208.8K prize pool
Andrew Brunette (Woodland, Washington)
#1651
#1109
+542
2nd of 629 entries, $175.1K prize pool
Wille Scott (Courtenay, British Columbia)
#1106
2nd of 346 entries, $506.3K prize pool
Joe Gates (Burns, Oregon)
#1919
#1092
+827
5th of 3180 entries, $1M prize pool
Steven Boyd (Albany, Oregon)
#1537
#999
+538
2nd of 339 entries, $203.3K prize pool

Boyd cracks the top 1,000 with a cash back in December that—ahem—didn’t get reported to The Hendon Mob until relatively recently.

Kale Satta-Hutton (Portland, Oregon)
#2094
#870
+1224
1st of 441 entries, $306.9K prize pool
Antonio Ma (Calgary, Alberta)
#682
2nd of 133 entries, $144K prize pool

Ma comes into the Leaderboard as a new entry, though he has another, larger score at WSOPC Thunder Valley in January.

Jason Heang (Edmonton, Alberta)
#669
3rd of 282 entries, $208.8K prize pool

This is Heang’s debut on the Leaderboard, though he has a couple other cashes that would have qualified him last year when I wasn’t keeping the Leaderboard updated.

Sterling Lopez (Anchorage, Alaska)
#502
#425
+77
3rd of 984 entries, $196.8K prize pool
Aaron Quon (Richmond, British Columbia)
#587
#411
+176
2nd of 309 entries, $311.7K prize pool
Scott Lake (Bremerton, Washington)
#1034
#404
+630
3rd of 47 entries, $470K prize pool

Lake had a cash the previous day in the Triple Stud Mix event, but not enough ROI to qualify for the Leaderboard.

Yunkyu Song (Camas, Washington)
#231
#160
+71
4th of 458 entries, $1.4M prize pool
Andrew Rodgers (Anchorage, Alaska)
#111
#86
+25
1st of 748 entries, $725.5K prize pool
Kyle Ho (Burnaby, British Columbia)
#71
#72
-1
2nd of 253 entries, $151.1K prize pool
Chad Wassmuth (Lewiston, Washington)
#75
#68
+7
2nd of 1272 entries, $1.8M prize pool
Kao Saechao (Damascus, Oregon)
#41
#42
-1
1st of 629 entries, $175.1K prize pool
Mike Kinney (Sand Point, Idaho)
#51
#39
+12
2nd of 458 entries, $1.4M prize pool
Maxwell Young (Oregon)
#23
#22
+1
1st of 264 entries, $264K prize pool
Adam Hendrix (Anchorage, Alaska)
#8
#6
+2
5th of 1659 entries, $2.5M prize pool
8th of 132 entries, $660K prize pool
1st of 81 entries, $243K prize pool
Chris Brewer (Eugene, Oregon)
#2
#2
0
6th of 124 entries, $3.8M prize pool
8th of 139 entries, $21.6M prize pool
Seth Davies (Bend, Oregon)
#1
#1
0
3rd of 82 entries, $3.7M prize pool
3rd of 33 entries, $1.3M prize pool
1st of 72 entries, $1.8M prize pool

Davies had six other cashes in the Triton Jeju series (for a total of eight cashes in seventeen events) each large enough to put most players’ career winnings to shame, but their ROI was less than 400%, so they do not appear on the Leaderboard.

2024 Chinook Winds PacWest Poker Classic, Cashless

Event #9 $10,000 Guaranteed HORSE

I always look forward to HORSE tournaments because I get so few opportunities to play them. My only WSOP bracelet tournament cash is a min-cash in the 2021 HORSE event that Norman Chad bubbled. But this was not to be another one.

Since the tournament didn’t start until 4pm, I headed to the Tillamook Air Museum, housed in the only one of the WWII blimp hangers left in the nation. It’s full of planes, including some replicas of fighters from a century ago that somehow only weighed as much as I do.

The tournament went well for just about four hours, I was cruising along until three devastating hands in Seven-Card Stud Hi-Lo took me from 15 big bets (well above average in the aggressive structure) down to 5BB, then I was run down on the river holding aces up by a flush.

Brad (First Friend of the Blog) Press was still in, though, and he maintained a decent chip stack through to the money, then crabbed his way up on the final table. Smaller stacks were busting out quickly with the chip average under 3 big bets, and a double elimination left him as the short stack between two equal-ish big stacks. He had a rolled-up pair in the last hand of Stud Hi-lo, took third place when it didn’t hold up, and so far I’m ahead in our $5/5% swap for the series.

Playing Big O as I’m typing this!

King of Asskissing — June to December 2023

This started off months ago as the wrap-up of my uneventful and mercifully brief trip to this year’s World Series of Poker, where I made attempts on two bracelet events (Event #7 Limit Hold’em and Event #9 Seven-Card Stud), played next to a very annoying person in an Aria $50K GTD HORSE tournament, ran a pair of aces aground in a Wynn $50K GTD NLHE Survivor that would have saved my trip, and at the Orleans $50K GTD NLHE before I headed home.

But I got bored writing about it and bored thinking about people not reading it even if I finished, so I put it off until the next month, and the next month, and by September I wasn’t sure I’d ever write another post here (it’s happened before, I have a personal blog on politics, programming, books, and games that’s gone years without updates).

But I’m back got a year-end wrap-up and what has got to be the most time-consuming Pacific Northwest Poker Leaderboard I’ve ever done.

That’s all water under the bridge, though. I barely remember the details.

What I do remember is, I have a database of every single cash game and tournament I’ve played since Black Friday in 2011. So here are a few numbers.

Overall Stats

Nearly 500 entries in the database with only 19 cash games. 149 profits in tournaments (31.5%), but that looks better than it actually is, for reasons I’ll get to in a minute. 4% ROI overall, 9% in tournaments. I wasn’t able to make either of the Chinook Winds series this year or any of the Wildhorse events.

Ignition Casino

Most of my play this year was online on Ignition, with 385 tournaments and 2 cash games. Most of that was in the $2 Jackpot Sit-n-Gos, 3-player turbo tournaments where the payout for first place is $4 or—in a very small percentage of the games—up to $2,400. I have never seen a payout larger than the 5x multiplier for $10. I won 117 of 320, which would have been a loss of $172 except for a number of $10 payouts, so a 4% ROI.

I played a number of Irish Poker Open qualifiers and satellites in the early part of the year, then mostly stuck to Fixed-Limit Omaha Hi-Lo, POLO, and PLO8 tournaments where I had a little success early on but lost money overall.

Home Games

My original home game group only got together once during the year (though I did just get an invite to the first game of 2024!) and even though I took 3rd, since I did a rebuy I lost $20. Do not rebuy in single-table tournaments inless you’re just there for the company.

The other home game is only at home for me. One of the players from the original game introduced me during the pandemic to a group that almost always meets for some $20/$25 home games using the Home Game feature of the PokerStars play money client. There’s an accompanying Zoom call, though I’m not usually on it since I just play from the living room while my wife and I are watching TV. Often, there are two—sometimes three—games during the night, usually starting out with NLHE, then a Bounty game of some sort: NLHE or PLO8. Just a couple of tables at most. Played 44 of those over the course of the year and cashed in 15 for a 25% ROI.

America’s Card Room

I had a little bit of money left on ACR at the beginning of the year, but I’d forgotten about it. Remembered it mid-year and that ACR had a better selection of non-NLHE tournaments than Ignition, so I played for a bit during the summer until I ran down my account (or did I? I’d better check). Took 4/55 in a Stud/8 tournament on my second outing and a 2/155 in a Big O Progressive Knockout, plus a bunch of min-cashes in games where I’d done a rebuy (this is called a loss), so -22% ROI over the course of 23 tournaments and 14 low-stakes Big O and Stud 8 cash games.

Portland Area

This is The Game, Final Table, and Last Frontier (in La Center). The year kicked off great at Last Frontier, where my first poker of 2023 was a three-way chop in a $10K GTD Limit Hold’em tournament. Then I thought I’d take that run and apply it at The Game’s Big O tournament where I was the first player out (after losing 25bb in NLHE cash). Back to Last Frontier for an early out in a $25K GTD NLHE tournament, and in October, Brad Press convinced me to drive up for the $8/$16 Limit Omaha 8 cash games. Waited around for those for a while, got in, and blasted away a couple hundred pretty fast.

At Final Table, I played several of the $20K GTD NLHE First Friday tournaments, never getting into the money (or closer than about 35% of the field) but there’s something about the jumps in the top of their payout structures that’s been bugging me since I noticed it last December.

A jump of $290 from 8th to 7th. Jump of $285 from 7th to 6th. Jump of $290 from 6th to 5th. $285 again from 5th to 4th. $580 jump from 4th to 3rd. 100% increase of $2880 from 3rd to 2nd. Only $2,045 increase from 2nd to 1st. Weird.

ROI for all of that: 0%. $8 profit on $2,595 costs, with everything zeroed out only by the January score at Last Frontier!

Vegas

The trip to the World Series of Poker this year was a complete bust, poker-wise. I only had one weekend, spent it at Ellis Island with my co-worker Ben, and got in a quick meet-up with Kevmath while I was waiting for Brad Press to get through to the registration desk.

My targets were two of the smallest $1500 buy-in bracelet events of the Series: #7 Limit Hold’em and #9 7-Card Stud. Didn’t make it even close to Day 2 of either one. Brad and I headed over to Aria on my third day to play the $50K GTD HORSE tournament there. I made it halfway through and suffered through a pro sitting next to me who felt entitled to reach his pinkie under my arm to flick my ante chip in when he through I was going to be too slow getting it in for the next hand. Brad did well, though, coming in 5th, and his buddy Bobby got first. I busted out and late-regged a Wynn NLHE Survivor tournament with a $5K payout that would have completely saved the trip, doubled up almost immediately, then let my aces get cracked on a paired board by Q9. My last day, it was the Orleans for a long slog in their $50K NLHE tournament where I beat two-thirds of the field but went home empty-handed.

Portland Meadows

When I was playing more often, I spent more time at Final Table than Portland Meadows, because I tried to avoid weekend games, and the bigger games at Meadows were on Saturday, while the major weekly tournaments at FT have always been on Friday night, which didn’t impact our home life as much. On the other hand, Meadows runs more non-NLHE tournaments, so I found myself drawn over there several times this year, starting with their Biggest of Os Big O tournament in February (brick), then their HEROS tournament in April (also brick). A rebuy in a little PLO tournament in August gort me halfway through the field.

Then, on a whim, I went out for a Saturday night NLHE Freezeout in September and a two-way chop. Then, the next month at the Big Bet Mix I nabbed 2nd out of the field of 55.

Back in December for the weekend of the Oregon State Championship, I busted from the NLHE day before the end of registration, but got through the 111-entry field for the Big O championship to the foinal table with the largest stack, staying that way up to the point I was heads-up with the eventual winner. Another straight -out 2nd place, no deal, no chop.

So, overall, it’s been a profitable year. More profitable if I hadn’t gone down to Vegas, but that’s probably not going to stop me from doing it again in 2024.

Enough about me! Let the wild rumpus begin!

Pacific Northwest Poker Leaderboard: End-of-Year 2023

The last Leaderboard was almost exactly a year ago. I didn’t think I was going to run it again, but after talking to people about this here blog at the Big O tournament earlier in the month, I thought I’d check to see if the script I wrote six or seven years ago would still do the job, even though it would need to deal with a lot more data (a year’s worth of results rather than a month) and I couldn’t be sure the formats of the Hendon Mob state/province leaderboards hadn’t changed. But everything worked!

My previous methodology was to report on every player with a cash of more than $10,000 in the reporting period, but as you can guess, with a period 12 times as long (there are nearly 250 new players on the lisrt by the old measure); I’d never get a year-long Leaderboard done because, let’s face it, nobody’s paying me to do this and I’m a lazy, semi-retired poker player. So this edition is going to be sort of seat-of-the-pants*, and I’m going to look for highlights. Apologies if you should be on here for your accomplishments last year and I didn’t include you!

* After finishing this sucker off, this is the methodology:

  1. Only new or updated players with $120K of earnings reported on Hendon Mob over the past year.
  2. Only events with payouts of $10K or more; many of these players have other cashes through the year under $10,000.
  3. Only events with 400% ROI. This rules out a lot of cashes that are five or even six figures where the buy-in was substantial.
  4. Presented in reverse order of their current standing on the Leaderboard, not by the amount won in 2023, although that’s a rough gauge.

Key to the Leaderboard

  • Name and home town (according to the player’s Hendon Mob profile).
  • The player’s most recent ranking in the PNW Poker Leaderboard in italics. If this is their first time on the Leaderboard, an em dash ()
  • Their new standing in bold, preceded by the pound sign (#).
  • Their change in status on the Leaderboard (with an arrow indicating up or down), or a black club (♣) if this is their first appearance.
  • For each of the tournaments that are being recognized in this Leaderboard:
    • The name and link to the Hendon Mob listing for that tournament.
    • The player’s finishing position in the tournament and the number of entries.
    • The tournament prize pool in US dollars.
Chris Hundley (Kirkland, Washington)
#7827
#642
+7185
1st of 180 entries, $145.9K prize pool
3rd of 556 entries, $742.2K prize pool
Kali Shuali (Vancouver, British Columbia)
#638
1st of 226 entries, $158.2K prize pool
1st of 472 entries, $101K prize pool
Vincent Wong (British Columbia)
#529
4th of 385 entries, $251.5K prize pool
7th of 564 entries, $389.1K prize pool
Alexander Cole-Gardner (Bend, Oregon)
#495
3rd of 446 entries, $313.6K prize pool
6th of 7300 entries, $4.9M prize pool
Brent Mutter (Poulsbo, Washington)
#1538
#468
+1070
2nd of 263 entries, $702.2K prize pool
Mehmet Siginc (Calgary, Alberta)
#416
1st of 120 entries, $78.5K prize pool
1st of 287 entries, $268.2K prize pool
1st of 136 entries, $92.5K prize pool

Not huge fields or giant prize pools, but three first places in a row puts Siginc on the Leaderboard in a big way.

Stephen Dauphinais (Edmonton, Alberta)
#1504
#408
+1096
5th of 454 entries, $315.4K prize pool
9th of 946 entries, $1M prize pool
2nd of 236 entries, $165.4K prize pool
4th of 287 entries, $268.2K prize pool
2nd of 325 entries, $190.9K prize pool
Krystn Hady (Calgary, Alberta)
#3865
#394
+3471
1st of 946 entries, $1M prize pool
George Heim (Cooper Landing, Alaska)
#912
#389
+523
2nd of 183 entries, $78.6K prize pool
3rd of 805 entries, $780.8K prize pool
Jason Johnson (Spokane, Washington)
#377
2nd of 3778 entries, $2.6M prize pool

Imagine having your first-ever recorded cash as runner-up for a bracelet in a $2.6M tournament.

Kelly Gall (Calgary, Alberta)
#1007
#348
+659
2nd of 4303 entries, $1.9M prize pool
Johnathan French (Canmore, Alberta)
#307
1st of 1432 entries, $1.6M prize pool

Only one recorded cash last year—and that in January—but it was a doozy.

Zhigang Yang (Richmond, British Columbia)
#2818
#291
+2527
7th of 1314 entries, $4.1M prize pool
104th of 3835 entries, $40M prize pool
Nicholas Lee (Calgary, Alberta)
#2260
#276
+1984
1st of 1539 entries, $377.7K prize pool
3rd of 287 entries, $268.2K prize pool
1st of 325 entries, $190.9K prize pool
Matt Kwong (Calgary, Alberta)
#426
#262
+164
2nd of 946 entries, $1M prize pool
Stephen Nahm (Burnaby, British Columbia)
#245
1st of 2017 entries, $1.7M prize pool

Nahm hasn’t shown up on the Leaderboard before because he hasn’t had a five-figure cash since I started tracking British Columbia, but he racked up four cashes at the WSOP and one at the Venetian this summer, including the PLO bracelet.

Tyler Willse (Hillsboro, Oregon)
#348
#219
+129
3rd of 385 entries, $193.9K prize pool
3rd of 1270 entries, $1.1M prize pool
Joon Park (Surrey, British Columbia)
#441
#217
+224
1st of 502 entries, $123.6K prize pool
2nd of 454 entries, $315.4K prize pool
3rd of 392 entries, $278.6K prize pool
5th of 338 entries, $323.1K prize pool
3rd of 236 entries, $165.4K prize pool
Kang Lee (Edmonton, Alberta)
#814
#214
+600
1st of 1710 entries, $1.5M prize pool
Eric Trexler (Bremerton, Washington)
#1143
#200
+943
2nd of 23088 entries, $5.6M prize pool
Haven Taylor (Calgary, Alberta)
#379
#193
+186
1st of 254 entries, $71.6K prize pool
1st of 1057 entries, $729.3K prize pool
Pen Li (Calgary, Alberta)
#236
#168
+68
11th of 6085 entries, $3.1M prize pool
159th of 10043 entries, $93.3M prize pool
Mike Kim (Surrey, British Columbia)
#287
#167
+120
1st of 61 entries, $78.7K prize pool
1st of 387 entries, $383.9K prize pool
4th of 209 entries, $202.7K prize pool
Nohad Tellani (Edmonton, Alberta)
#300
#164
+136
5th of 155 entries, $325.7K prize pool
2nd of 22 entries, $51.2K prize pool
4th of 220 entries, $255.6K prize pool
3rd of 407 entries, $618.6K prize pool
5th of 209 entries, $202.7K prize pool
Mike Thorpe (Auburn, Washington)
#309
#153
+156
3rd of 69 entries, $690K prize pool
1st of 424 entries, $123.8K prize pool
Colton Yamagishi (Edmonton, Alberta)
#218
#150
+68
22nd of 1432 entries, $1.6M prize pool
1st of 138 entries, $38.7K prize pool
3rd of 61 entries, $78.7K prize pool
2nd of 108 entries, $55K prize pool
2nd of 136 entries, $92.5K prize pool
3rd of 274 entries, $285.5K prize pool
Brian Barker (Portland, Oregon)
#1121
#148
+973
42nd of 23088 entries, $5.6M prize pool
3rd of 274 entries, $274K prize pool
3rd of 237 entries, $96.6K prize pool
1st of 547 entries, $264.8K prize pool
2nd of 4950 entries, $2.5M prize pool
Andrew Rogers (Anchorage, Alaska)
#247
#128
+119
1st of 124 entries, $52.3K prize pool
3rd of 345 entries, $113.8K prize pool
18th of 3778 entries, $2.6M prize pool
3rd of 274 entries, $264.4K prize pool
Wayne Harmon (Portland, Oregon)
#155
#115
+40
24th of 1736 entries, $4.6M prize pool
12th of 2157 entries, $1.1M prize pool
13th of 1417 entries, $2.4M prize pool
2nd of 1103 entries, $414.5K prize pool
20th of 934 entries, $1.4M prize pool
Mel Hagen (Lanngley, British Columbia)
#349
#114
+235
20th of 2454 entries, $3.2M prize pool
4th of 3856 entries, $5.5M prize pool
2nd of 547 entries, $530.5K prize pool

Before last summer, Hagen hadn’t had a recorded cash since 2015. In addition to these, he had another 15 in 2023. So he appears to be back, baby.

Kao Saechao (Renton, Washington)
#193
#110
+83
1st of 477 entries, $329.1K prize pool
1st of 177 entries, $74.6K prize pool
1st of 357 entries, $55.3K prize pool
Andy Truong (Edmonton, Alberta)
#145
#104
+41
3rd of 1637 entries, $2.3M prize pool
18th of 3496 entries, $5.2M prize pool
Dien Le (Bellevue, Washington)
#109
#101
+8
11th of 2952 entries, $1M prize pool
3rd of 49 entries, $112.7K prize pool
2nd of 249 entries, $125.7K prize pool
1st of 226 entries, $60.9K prize pool
Aaron Thivyanathan (Renton, Washington)
#94
#80
+14
35th of 4747 entries, $3.3M prize pool
5th of 376 entries, $262.5K prize pool
Mark Mounsey (Victoria, British Columbia)
#3939
#84
+3855
8th of 3835 entries, $40M prize pool
Kyle Ho (Burnaby, British Columbia)
#86
#69
+17
4th of 228 entries, $134.9K prize pool
1st of 224 entries, $146.5K prize pool
6th of 224 entries, $330.5K prize pool
2nd of 321 entries, $147.1K prize pool
Lonnie Hallett (Big Valley, Alberta)
#424
#66
+358
1st of 8180 entries, $7.2M prize pool
Clemen Deng (Portland, Oregon)
#205
#64
+141
73rd of 10043 entries, $93.3M prize pool
5th of 125 entries, $380K prize pool
6th of 3496 entries, $5.2M prize pool
1st of 582 entries, $1M prize pool

Where the hell did Deng come from? No recorded cashes until the pandemic and then bang!

Karim Chatur (Calgary, Alberta)
#59
#56
+3
91st of 10043 entries, $93.3M prize pool
1st of 210 entries, $73.7K prize pool
Mike Kinney (Sand Point, Idaho)
#58
#51
+7
4th of 122 entries, $118.3K prize pool
3rd of 152 entries, $1.5M prize pool
Angela Jordison (Redmond, Oregon)
#60
#47
+13
1st of 101 entries, $303K prize pool
5th of 679 entries, $1M prize pool
5th of 212 entries, $206.7K prize pool
21st of 1598 entries, $4.2M prize pool
8th of 397 entries, $601.4K prize pool
Scott Eskenazi (Mercer Island, Washington)
#72
#42
+30
5th of 184 entries, $506K prize pool
1st of 590 entries, $1.8M prize pool
35th of 2076 entries, $2.7M prize pool

The win at Thunder Valley was the largest in Eskenazi’s long career.

Jaspal Brar (Edmonton, Alberta)
#44
#40
+4
2nd of 250 entries, $245K prize pool
Calvin Lee (Mercer Island, Washington)
#102
#38
+64
4th of 78 entries, $780K prize pool
9th of 346 entries, $1.6M prize pool
Noah Bronstein (Bellevue, Washington)
#35
#37
-2
6th of 331 entries, $883.7K prize pool
Thomas Taylor (Medicine hat, Alberta)
#37
#35
+2
1st of 234 entries, $161.7K prize pool
9th of 2017 entries, $1.7M prize pool
3rd of 338 entries, $323.1K prize pool
42nd of 3446 entries, $5.1M prize pool
Jeffrey Farnes (Dallas, Oregon)
#29
#29
0
4th of 184 entries, $506K prize pool
4th of 251 entries, $243.4K prize pool
Daniel Idema (Vancouver, British Columbia)
#25
#26
-1
2nd of 134 entries, $12.4M prize pool
Elliot Smith (Richmond, British Columbia)
#23
#25
-2
4th of 279 entries, $541.2K prize pool
1st of 48 entries, $50K prize pool
Maxwell Young (Oregon)
#24
#23
+1
16th of 1074 entries, $1.1M prize pool
8th of 327 entries, $580.4K prize pool
2nd of 1093 entries, $360.9K prize pool
4th of 257 entries, $178.6K prize pool
31st of 1598 entries, $4.2M prize pool
3rd of 483 entries, $470.9K prize pool
7th of 187 entries, $374K prize pool
4th of 62 entries, $186K prize pool
1st of 119 entries, $133.4K prize pool
Darren Rabinowitz (Mercer Island, Washington)
#20
#21
-1
4th of 180 entries, $145.9K prize pool
4th of 885 entries, $858.4K prize pool
2nd of 356 entries, $106.8K prize pool
4th of 180 entries, $145.9K prize pool
3rd of 315 entries, $147.1K prize pool
3rd of 477 entries, $1M prize pool
5th of 515 entries, $515K prize pool
2nd of 310 entries, $93K prize pool
1st of 436 entries, $392K prize pool
2nd of 146 entries, $138.7K prize pool
3rd of 550 entries, $530.9K prize pool
Tyler Patterson (Washington)
#19
#20
-1
2nd of 466 entries, $205.4K prize pool
1st of 477 entries, $1M prize pool
George Wolff (Portland, Oregon)
#18
#19
-1
6th of 86 entries, $860K prize pool
4th of 88 entries, $880K prize pool
Amichai Barer (Vancouver, British Columbia)
#16
#16
0
2nd of 149 entries, $71.6K prize pool
6th of 2234 entries, $2.1M prize pool
Dylan Wilkerson (Seattle, Washington)
#14
#15
-1
2nd of 564 entries, $389.1K prize pool
4th of 522 entries, $172.2K prize pool
Adam Walton (Seattle, Washington)
#64
#9
+55
3rd of 807 entries, $778.7K prize pool
3rd of 10043 entries, $93.3M prize pool
5th of 860 entries, $808.4K prize pool
2nd of 238 entries, $339.1K prize pool
11th of 3010 entries, $14.5M prize pool
Adam Hendrix (Anchorage, Alaska)
#13
#8
+5
3rd of 257 entries, $514K prize pool
3rd of 130 entries, $1.3M prize pool
3rd of 89 entries, $845K prize pool
5th of 200 entries, $9.5M prize pool
James Romero (Portland, Oregon)
#7
#6
+1
1st of 721 entries, $1M prize pool
6th of 441 entries, $996.6K prize pool
7th of 594 entries, $652.5K prize pool
26th of 2454 entries, $3.2M prize pool
69th of 2231 entries, $7.1M prize pool
7th of 1440 entries, $741.6K prize pool
2nd of 547 entries, $530.9K prize pool
13th of 746 entries, $1M prize pool
Dylan Linde (Coeur D’Alene, Idaho)
#5
#4
+1
1st of 114 entries, $313.5K prize pool
10th of 441 entries, $996.6K prize pool
1st of 286 entries, $271.7K prize pool

Linde had a number of other deep-ish runs in big buy-in events that ran into six figures each, but they didn’t meet my arbitrary 400% ROI metric for reporting.

Chris Brewer (Eugene, Oregon)
#4
#2
+2
1st of 33 entries, $1.1M prize pool
1st of 50 entries, $3.4M prize pool
3rd of 166 entries, $4.1M prize pool
3rd of 24 entries, $1.5M prize pool
2nd of 93 entries, $930K prize pool
6th of 87 entries, $1.3M prize pool
1st of 24 entries, $925K prize pool
2nd of 19 entries, $950K prize pool
3rd of 64 entries, $1.5M prize pool
1st of 69 entries, $17.1M prize pool
3rd of 51 entries, $510K prize pool
1st of 154 entries, $1.4M prize pool
2nd of 83 entries, $3M prize pool
2nd of 24 entries, $1.1M prize pool
4th of 91 entries, $910K prize pool
4th of 44 entries, $1.1M prize pool
4th of 50 entries, $1.2M prize pool
4th of 88 entries, $16.8M prize pool
4th of 90 entries, $6.8M prize pool
2nd of 29 entries, $290K prize pool

It was a good year to be Chris Brewer, A really good year.

Seth Davies (Bend, Oregon)
#1
#1
0
4th of 83 entries, $830K prize pool
2nd of 40 entries, $4.7M prize pool
7th of 97 entries, $3.3M prize pool
3rd of 35 entries, $1.2M prize pool
4th of 166 entries, $4.1M prize pool
7th of 122 entries, $2.5M prize pool
5th of 110 entries, $5.1M prize pool
3rd of 14 entries, $906.6K prize pool
2nd of 30 entries, $1M prize pool
5th of 124 entries, $5.9M prize pool
4th of 2068 entries, $4.6M prize pool
1st of 28 entries, $280K prize pool
5th of 69 entries, $3.3M prize pool
5th of 133 entries, $1.3M prize pool

And that’s it! It took a long time! Hope you enjoyed it.

WSOP 2021: My Time Is Coming

So people of the world
You take a bow
Cause I used to be out
But I’m flaming now
So hold on tight
With your knuckles white, cause
My time is coming

OMG, I’ve had “What’s Love Got to Do With It?” stuck in my head as an earworm this whole trip. It’s keeping me up at night; right now it’s 4:30am and I’ve been awake for an hour.

That could be because I’ve got some latent adrenaline after yesterday, or it could be because my memory for lyrics is bad, so the chorus of the song is on an endless repeat like the Sergio Leone-style anthem music the WSOP plays over and over before events start.

The restart time for Event #27 $1500 HORSE Day 2 wasn’t until 2pm, so after writing up my post on Day 1, I thought about heading down to satellite land to play the 9am mega but I decided that since Wednesday’s hadn’t had that many entries, I’d be better served keeping it fresh for the HORSE. It felt a little weird to be not playing poker for half a day, considering I’m only here for four days, but I braved the crossing to the Walgreens to pick up some goodies (by which I mean a lot of Diet Coke), rested on the couch, and talked to my wife and father on the phone.

I consulted my wife on the question of which card cap to use for Day 2, and she said to go with the gold.

So, even with only about 4 hours of sleep, I felt up to the task of trying to somehow make a stack about one-third the average last for the day.

The day started off with good news for me, because I picked up a great hand in the first game of the day—Omaha/8—and managed to more than double up, which put me in median stack territory and room to wait for hands. One of the players at the table came back with just 6500, doubled on the first hand with an AAKx hand but was still so short that he was knocked out shortly after that.

We were early in the break order, so by the next time I did an update on the PokerNews MyStack app, I’d been moved to another table. I got another double-up there that took me to 95k. Warning #1 for anyone using MyStack, if you take a photo (at least on the iPhone) through the app, MyStack does not save the photo to your Photos library! So take the pic with your Camera and add it to the MyStack post from Photos, or you’re never going to have access to that sweet, sweet chip porn, because there’s no way to export the image.

It was a bit of a roller coaster, I have to say. I haven’t played much HORSE live or online in recent years, and I can’t say I remember my game being this swingy before. Maybe I just don’t remember it. Anyway, two hours in, I was n worse shape than when I started, with just three big bets and 45 players to go before the money.

Did You Miss Me, Baby? Here I Am.

That was right about the time I went to do an update on MyStack and noticed that I’d been reported busted by PokerNews somehow.

I mean, geez, I didn’t think I was significant enough to get even a cursory bust report. We’re they reading my Twitter reports and just extrapolating? I mean, I’m a former WSOP live reporter and a former contributor to PokerNews.com. Where’s the love? I went over to the media table to check things out and the guy was unhelpful. I suspect this is some sort of software bug, because at my last table of the day, I heard James Woods, who reports on the app, mentioning to someone on the rail that it had happened to him, and I’m pretty sure nobody’s erroneously marking him out.

Just a note to the MyStack devs who aren’t reading this post: the Feed needs times, not just the date.

Another table change and I had a couple great hands in Stud/8 that put me back over 100K. Briefly.

That was the peak for me. We had 20 places to the money still, and I got my third(?) table change, finally over to the far side of the Orange section, about three hours into the day. Half an hour later were were told we were going hand-for-hand, then after about five minutes where I could see Norman Chad and some other folks standing at a table in the middle of the section, a rumor started going around we were already in the money.. Finally the announcement came through and I’d cashed at the WSOP for the first time. It was almost a little anti-climatic.

https://twitter.com/normanchad/status/1448816424416280577?s=21

I was back to critically short by this point. Not so much from trying to eke into the min-cash but because I’d gotten Stud hands in the Razz rounds and Razz hands in the Stud rounds. Limits were up to 8k/16k; even the 2K antes in the Stud games were eating though my shot stack pretty fast. I had to commit to a Stud/8 hand that looked pretty good with three low cars a nut flush possibility, but the best I ended up with was a pair of threes. And that was it! I was a WSOP casher on my fourth bracelet event.

Got my cash from Payout, went back to Amazon to take a pic of the tournament clock—I forgot when I busted, I’m out of practice—then headed to my room to try to catch up various people. Apologies to the little poker group I belong to, PokerTeam 1: Brad, Steve, and Daryl, who I’d been updating through the day but neglected to ell I’d cashed among all the other people I was informing.

So, is a Smashburger a thing? Because it seems to me every short-order cook already used their spatula to smush the patty onto the grill.

Not sure what I’m gong to do with the next day and a half. I’m hoping the satellite scene picks up a bit on the weekend, plus going to try to arch up with Jeremy Harkin who’s been greatly encouraging—not to mention renting me a room wen I was down here as a reporter—and maybe grab a beer or two with Kevmath if we can squeeze it in.

WSOP 2021: Choose Your Own H.O.R.S.E. Adventure

This isn’t (hopefully) going to be a long post; it’s a little before 8:30am as I’m typing this, hoping I’ll get sleepy by staring at the screen, but I’ve been up for over an hour and I didn’t get to sleep until 4.

Yesterday started off with me popping over to Denny’s catty-corner from the Rio. It seems like, despite the wide-open rep of Las Vegas—many of the restaurants in the casino complex are shuttered—at least during the weekdays—which has led to scenes like this.

Denny’s, on the other hand, was busy and considerably less expensive than anything I’d seen on the menus at the Rio. All you have to do is take your life into your hands by walking across both Flamingo and Valley View each direction during morning rush hour to get there.

First order of the day was to get registered for Event #196 $180 NLHE Turbo Mega Satellite. I had my three $500 lammers from the evening before, but I was hoping to pick up another $1500 in lammers from this satellite. I’m starting to think my decision to grind satellites in the COVID era was -EV. By the end of registration, only 18 players had joined in, which meat just one full payout and one of two lamps and $200 cash. I had one [ax qx] hand get all in against [ax jx] and lose, which mostly wiped me out an I ended up fifth. The other players were discussing how to potentially chop it up as I picked up my bag, while the TD pretended something on the far wall of the Pavilion room was interesting.

That took a couple hours. It was time to make a decision about the path of my next three days in Vegas. I was (discounting expenses and treating my lammers as actual dollars) slightly ahead on the trip after the first day. Do I a) buy into the HORSE tournament? or b) use the lammers for the bulk of three more $580 mega satellites? With the number of players the mega were getting, I wasn’t sure how many of those were going to be profitable for me—I really prefer the larger satellite fields—and they could mean forgoing the two other bracelet events I was interested in.

As it happened, my passions took the lead and I dropped my lammers at the cage to register for HORSE.

My first table in the HORSE tournament couldn’t have had a better location. Though it also had Ian Johns in the seat next to me. It seemed like several other players there were from Washington state, as well. The next table wasn’t so good, in the ass-end of the Tan section of Amazon with bad lighting that made it difficult for the older players—not me, of course—to see the stud variant up cards at the other end of the table. Ran into some serious hardships and was down to 7k from 25k at one point before a phenomenal O8 segment took me up over starting stack and nearly 40k.

Got moved after a couple hours to a table with better lighting but also Alan Kessler. I lost the first hand I played there (to him) and then a (for me) massive hand where I had seven hearts in stud and I had to call off on the river when he raised me with his rivered boat. That stung. I did manage to pull off a flush that held up against Anthony Zinno to recover a bit.

Got moved to a table with Barry Greenstein and was dealt [2d 3d 4d] in Razz, which got me excited. Then I got 2 black kings, which took some of the edge off. At this point, we were nearing the final three levels of play, which is still two hours before bagging, but I’d made it past the ed of registration, and if I could hang on with my <10 big bet stack, I might be able to make Day 2.

Attendance was down a bit for this event. There were 751 entries in 2019 and just 594 yesterday, which is a full 20% drop. I’m guessing that’s probably worse for someone like myself, because most of the people who aren’t showing up are the more casual HORSE players (like me).

Ran into Joe Brandenberg in the halls, and Jeff Mitseff at the next table at the end of the night. We got the “five hands” notice from the floor just as we headed into the Razz round. I think I managed to stay out of most of those hands.

Anyway, my table draw is interesting. Felipe Ramos is #3 in live tournament earnings in Brazil. Ron Ware runs the Mixed Game Poker in Las Vegas group on Facebook.

After we bagged up, I needed to find some food. If there was anything open at the Rio during the day, it wasn’t open at 2:15am. I headed across to Ping Pang Pong (crossing Valley View in the dark, yeek!) and managed to wolf down my first food since breakfast. This hibernation fat is good for something!

Going to try to make the day last as long as I can! Usually I change out the card cover each time I cash, I’ve got to decide whether making Day 2 of my first WSOP bracelet event is significant enough to swap out.